Luke's Commonplace Book

Apr 12

robertogreco:


FOR HIRE practice run (draft one), quotes from Erin and Robin via Alan


I wish I was in charge of making hiring decisions for an organization, because this would be the easiest decision ever. To quote ayjay: “I’m trying to imagine an organization that wouldn’t benefit from having Roberto in it. In the meantime, he’s a pure gift to anyone who looks for ideas online.” 

robertogreco:

FOR HIRE practice run (draft one), quotes from Erin and Robin via Alan

I wish I was in charge of making hiring decisions for an organization, because this would be the easiest decision ever. To quote ayjay: “I’m trying to imagine an organization that wouldn’t benefit from having Roberto in it. In the meantime, he’s a pure gift to anyone who looks for ideas online.” 

Feb 12

writingprompts:


524


grief & loss reflection activity

writingprompts:

524

grief & loss reflection activity

Feb 10

edwardspoonhands:

This is The Name of The Wind. Buy it.
The Name of The Wind is my book suggestion of the year. I read it about six months ago and I’m still thinking about it. It is the best book I have read in years, fantasy or otherwise. 
The Name of The Wind needs to be the next book you read. And the next book after that, I can guarantee, will be the second in the Kingkiller Chronicles “The Wise Man’s Fear.”
I am a Harry Potter fan, you probably are a Harry Potter fan as well. But, in the years since you read Harry Potter, you’ve grown up a bit. This is the book that Harry Potter fans have been looking for. It’s not a book for Harry Potter fans…it’s just a book that I think people who loved Harry Potter and are now in their 20s or 30s would REALLY REALLY ENJOY.
I bought this book because I was in the book store and I tweeted “BOOK SUGGESTIONS PLEASE” and about 12 people suggested it. I am so thankful to those 12 people. 
The world is so deep, the stakes are so high, the characters so real, the mysteries so magical, the magic so mysterious, the plot so twisty…every day you haven’t read it is a day in your life that could be better. 
I do not take this review lightly…buy this book. Buy it now. On Amazon or, preferably, at your local book store.
If you love The Name of The Wind, reblog.

Hank, make your brother read this book, and once Dave is finished with it, make John read it too.

edwardspoonhands:

This is The Name of The Wind. Buy it.

The Name of The Wind is my book suggestion of the year. I read it about six months ago and I’m still thinking about it. It is the best book I have read in years, fantasy or otherwise. 

The Name of The Wind needs to be the next book you read. And the next book after that, I can guarantee, will be the second in the Kingkiller Chronicles “The Wise Man’s Fear.”

I am a Harry Potter fan, you probably are a Harry Potter fan as well. But, in the years since you read Harry Potter, you’ve grown up a bit. This is the book that Harry Potter fans have been looking for. It’s not a book for Harry Potter fans…it’s just a book that I think people who loved Harry Potter and are now in their 20s or 30s would REALLY REALLY ENJOY.

I bought this book because I was in the book store and I tweeted “BOOK SUGGESTIONS PLEASE” and about 12 people suggested it. I am so thankful to those 12 people. 

The world is so deep, the stakes are so high, the characters so real, the mysteries so magical, the magic so mysterious, the plot so twisty…every day you haven’t read it is a day in your life that could be better. 

I do not take this review lightly…buy this book. Buy it now. On Amazon or, preferably, at your local book store.

If you love The Name of The Wind, reblog.

Hank, make your brother read this book, and once Dave is finished with it, make John read it too.

Feb 02

“The danger… lies in the soft tyranny of institutions, authorities, and experts—of people who know what’s best for you and don’t hesitate to make sure you know it, too.” — Adam Kirsch, “A Poet’s Warning” in reference to W.H. Auden’s “Under Which Lyre

(via robertogreco)

Jan 30

The writer John McPhee had these two pictures framed together, side by side above his typewriter as he wrote. His daughter Jenny explains a bit about it: “It is precisely this yoking together of images, concepts, and emotions followed by the surprise, delight, and even shock of what can happen that thrills me in a piece of a writing and makes me want to keep picking up a pen.”

The writer John McPhee had these two pictures framed together, side by side above his typewriter as he wrote. His daughter Jenny explains a bit about it: “It is precisely this yoking together of images, concepts, and emotions followed by the surprise, delight, and even shock of what can happen that thrills me in a piece of a writing and makes me want to keep picking up a pen.”

Jan 18

“We have to grapple with the world as we find it, and we find a world that’s either random or else acts in a way that’s identical to how it would act if it were random.” — John Green

Jan 17

“The marshmallow study captured the public imagination because it is a funny story, easily told, that appears to reduce the complex social and psychological question of why some people succeed in life to a simple, if ancient, formulation: Character is destiny. Except that in this case, the formulation isn’t coming from the Greek philosopher Heraclitus or from a minister preaching that “patience is a virtue” but from science, that most modern of popular religions.” — We Didn’t Eat the Marshmallow. The Marshmallow Ate Us.

Jan 16

image

But, of course, “ascetic” doesn’t mean “joyless.” When I read Williams yesterday, and then went back to the Hall interview, I was reminded of a wedding I attended in Portland several years ago. The reception was held in a converted barn. In lieu of a cake, the bride’s grandmother had made an assortment of fruit pies. Guests had been encouraged to bring their favorite board games, and we sat at round tables eating the pies and playing the games. The bride and groom made their way to each table, sitting with us and catching up with those they hadn’t seen in a while. Leaving the reception that night, the picture I had in mind of what they wanted their marriage to be was one that spoke of hospitality, of the fun that could be had with homemade food (rather than, as Hall has it, “catered extravagances”) and with the games that were already stacked in their home closet, rather than, necessarily, a night out. It’s a picture I wish more of us were attracted to.

Wesley Hill

Jan 13

How To Look at Art by Grant Snider

How To Look at Art by Grant Snider

Jan 02

“When I was in my early twenties, I spent a crazy amount of time thinking about a few diagrams in Frederic Jameson’s neo-Marxist book of literary theory, The Political Unconscious, where he described what we might now call a platform stack of different interpretative models—structuralism, psychoanalytic theory, New Criticism—that could somehow all be simultaneously deployed while still being faithful to an underlying Marxist framework. A few years ago I got into a conversation at the offices of the UK magazine, Prospect, with the wonderful science writer Oliver Morton. Somehow the Jameson book came up in conversation, and as I described my late-college obsession with it, I suddenly realized that the shape of Jameson’s argument—not the actual content, but the way the interpretative systems were stacked on top of each other—looked exactly like the “long zoom” approach I had been using, and writing about, in the last three books I’d published.” — Steven Johnson

Jan 01

(Source: robertogreco)

myjetpack:

An Alphabet of Books
A drawing I have in this show.
Also, I have a new print for sale.

myjetpack:

An Alphabet of Books

A drawing I have in this show.

Also, I have a new print for sale.

explore-blog:

So many layers of meaning, including a riff on the debated iPhone holiday ad, in this New Yorker cover by the one and only Chris Ware, who is truly one of the greatest graphic artists of our time – here’s the most revealing interview this reticent and reserved genius has ever given. 

explore-blog:

So many layers of meaning, including a riff on the debated iPhone holiday ad, in this New Yorker cover by the one and only Chris Ware, who is truly one of the greatest graphic artists of our time – here’s the most revealing interview this reticent and reserved genius has ever given. 

(Source: )

“If you want to understand how people will remember the Obama climate legacy, a few facts tell the tale: By the time Obama leaves office, the U.S. will pass Saudi Arabia as the planet’s biggest oil producer and Russia as the world’s biggest producer of oil and gas combined. In the same years, even as we’ve begun to burn less coal at home, our coal exports have climbed to record highs. We are, despite slight declines in our domestic emissions, a global-warming machine: At the moment when physics tell us we should be jamming on the carbon brakes, America is revving the engine.” — Bill McKibben (via ayjay)

“Once you have a point of view all history will back you up.” — Van Wyck Brooks, America’s Coming-of-Age (via)

(Source: austinkleon)